DigiCert Blog

All posts by: Jeremy Rowley

About Jeremy Rowley

As Executive Vice President of Emerging Markets Jeremy Rowley leads the company’s business and product development teams serving its emerging markets clients that require security solutions for the Internet of Things, U.S. federal healthcare exchange, advanced Wi-Fi and other innovative technology sectors. Rowley also represents DigiCert’s interests within various industry standards bodies and has authored several industry standards now in use. As part of DigiCert’s vision to lead its industry toward better and more trusted practices, Rowley actively participates in groups such as the CA/Browser Forum, IETF, Mozilla Forum, NIST, ICANN, and the CA Security Council and he continues to draft new policy and guidelines today.

  1. New CAA Requirement: What You Should Know

    Things are heating up at the CA/Browser Forum with exciting proposals surrounding inclusion of the Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) as a subjectAltName otherName, new validation methods, and debates over how the CAB Forum will continue operating. One of these new proposals is the recently passed Mozilla ballot that will require all Certificate Authorities (CAs) to check…


  2. Google CT to Expand to All Certificates Types

    A recent Google announcement says all publicly trusted SSL/TLS certificates issued in October 2017 or later will be expected to comply with Chrome’s Certificate Transparency (CT) policy in order to be trusted by that browser. Since January 2015, Chrome has required Extended Validation (EV) certificates to comply with CT, but now with this policy change, it…


  3. How Short-Lived Certificates Improve Certificate Trust

    Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) are important technologies that—with ongoing work to improve their operations—can continue to provide a foundation for online trust. However, recent efforts within the CA/Browser Forum and Mozilla’s decision to support “short-lived” certificates in future versions of Firefox have shined the spotlight on an innovation that…


  4. .Onion Officially Recognized as Special-Use Domain

    Good news for .onion sites: The .onion domain is now recognized as a special-use, top-level domain by the Internet Engineering Steering Group, thanks to efforts by Facebook and The Tor Project. This means that publicly trusted SSL Certificates can continue to be issued for .onion domains following the deprecation of internal names, which is happening…


  5. Four Considerations for Internet of Things

    Connected devices are hitting the market in droves. Gartner estimates there will be 25 billion connected devices by 2020. This means there will be billions of connected devices that are potentially transmitting unencrypted data. When these devices include high-value targets, such as medical devices, high energy devices, and devices containing personal data, the risk of…