DigiCert Blog

All posts under: Best Practices

  1. Cyber Insurance: The Next Big Thing?

    While there is obviously no cause to celebrate the devastation of the past years’ big cyber hacks, the consequences of these hacks have undeniably led to more urgent infosec development and practices. As Robert Parisi of the network insurance broker Marsh USA puts it, “The number of (data) breaches in 2013 certainly was the last…


  2. The Case for Making the Move from SHA-1 to SHA-2 Certificates

    Good security is a combination of building layers and staying one step ahead of would-be attackers. Mozilla recently announced that Firefox might end trust for SHA-1 Certificates six months sooner than the current SHA-1 deprecation timeline. This announcement came shortly after a research team expressed concerns about a theoretical risk associated with the SHA-1 hashing…


  3. Why Home Network Security Is Important

    The Internet of Things began as a concept of the future of connected technology and is now a reality. The average home has multiple connected devices, following in the footsteps of technologically savvy enterprises and businesses. However, more than half of consumers don’t actually believe that IoT devices have the necessary security in place to…


  4. Lessons to Learn from Two Different Insider Attacks

    The news and media often highlights vulnerabilities, malware, and negligent employee breaches as the only dangers organizations face, overlooking costlier insider threats. Surprisingly, stolen records for insider threats in the US cost $230 which is more than breaches caused by system glitches ($142) and human error ($134). Insider threats alone cost the US $40 billion…


  5. The True Cost of Self-Signed SSL Certificates

    While many companies make online security a priority in their business, there are just as many companies who risk securing their website with self-signed SSL Certificates. Because self-signed SSL Certificates are free, this option tempts both novice and veteran companies alike. However, self-signed SSL certificates are risky because they lack validation from a third party.…