DigiCert Blog

All posts under: Security

  1. Enterprise Security: Are Your Partners Secure?

    Making partnership decisions is contingent on creating symbiotic relationships. Most businesses choose their partners in order to increase sales, achieve common goals, and expand marketing reach. One thing that can go unnoticed when choosing a partner, however, is the organization’s dedication to secure business practices. With security risks as high as they are today, you cannot assume…


  2. The Fraud Problem with Free SSL Certificates

    SSL Certificates are the defacto standard for online trust today. SSLs are such a critical backbone to online security that Google gives a ranking boost to sites that secure their content with HTTPS. Savvy Internet users have come to recognize and expect that any website asking for sensitive or personal information to display the universal symbol—the padlock—before typing in…


  3. IoT Security as a Marketing Advantage

    Road trips are part of almost any American childhood, and more often than not, the stereotypes are true. Dad drives, getting lost at least once and refusing to stop for directions. Mom’s trying to make the car ride less boring with occasional family sing-alongs. Your brother zones out while listening to music on music on his cassette player.…


  4. Understanding OCSP Times and What They Mean for You

    The Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) is the fastest protocol we have for verifying certificate status. In a nutshell, here’s how OCSP works: An end user sends a request to the server, requesting certificate status information. Through the Online Certificate Status Protocol, a response is given as one of these four options “Success,” “Unauthorized,” “Malformed…


  5. The Current State of .Onion Certificates and What Happens Next

    Digital certificates allow users to verify they are connecting to a legitimate website and browse worry-free. Last year, DigiCert issued a certificate to Facebook’s .onion address and has since issued certificates to several other .onion addresses. These certificates allow Tor users to browse anonymously while still being able to identify that the website is operated…