DigiCert Blog

All posts under: SSL Certificate Management

  1. Advantages to Using a Centralized Management Platform for SSL Certificates

    SSL security is a critical component to an enterprise’s overall security strategy. With the increasing number of Internet-connected devices, online portals, and services that organizations manage, there are more opportunities for vulnerabilities and a growing number of threats that these systems face. System administrators are responsible for hundreds—if not thousands—of certificates that come with unique…


  2. The Case for Making the Move from SHA-1 to SHA-2 Certificates

    Good security is a combination of building layers and staying one step ahead of would-be attackers. Mozilla recently announced that Firefox might end trust for SHA-1 Certificates six months sooner than the current SHA-1 deprecation timeline. This announcement came shortly after a research team expressed concerns about a theoretical risk associated with the SHA-1 hashing…


  3. What the Acquisition of Cybertrust Roots Means for DigiCert Customers

    On June 23, 2015, DigiCert announced the acquisition of Cybertrust Root Certification Authorities, previously held by Verizon Enterprise Solutions.  At that time, we explained that the acquisition would provide those customers with innovative certificate management tools and industry-leading customer service, among other benefits. The purpose of this post is to explain more about the benefits…


  4. How to Remove an Expired Intermediate from the SSL Certificate Chain

    On September 30, 2015, at 12:15 pm, a legacy and long unused DigiCert cross-signed certificate expired, causing some users to experience untrusted certificate errors. The problem is generally related to a locally installed legacy intermediate certificate that is no longer used and no longer required. The problem may affect any client platform with a locally cached…


  5. Replace Your Certificates for Internal Names – Part II

    Internal name and reserved IP address certificates will expire by October 31, 2015. If you are reading this blog because you are knee-deep in replacing your publicly trusted internal name certificates, you have come to the right place. If you are just learning about replacing your internal name certificates, see our previous post Replacing Your Internal Name…